Open post

Medscape: Why ‘Burnout’ Is the Wrong Term for Physician Suffering

Could burnout and anti-burnout initiatives championed by healthcare institutions be the healthcare equivalent of gaslighting?

“Gaslighting” refers to the act of psychologically manipulating someone to question their own sanity, in order to gain some advantage. Intentional or not, it carries significant repercussions for its targets, which in this case may be clinicians in our struggling healthcare system. In this article, Drs. Dean and Talbot explain Why ‘Burnout’ Is the Wrong Term for Physician Suffering.

Open post

Physician’s Weekly: Solving the Double Binds of Moral Injury

Our words matter. As with making an accurate diagnosis, using accurate language to describe a situation is the necessary first step in describing its resolution. Labeling the current surfeit of physician distress as “burnout” inaccurately describes the condition and, therefore, misdirects potential solutions. We need the right words to describe the condition, which will allow for development of the right solutions. Moral Injury starts that conversation. Read on Physician’s Weekly: Solving the Double Binds of Moral Injury.

Open post

Health Leaders: Are Your Physician’s Suffering from Moral Injury – or Burnout?

The concept of moral injury expresses the systemic nature of the strain on physicians and the need for a comprehensive approach to address the problem. The root of the problem is “moral injury” resulting from the multiple roles physicians are playing in contradiction to their moral imperative to take care of patients, Simon Talbot, MD, and Wendy Dean, MD, wrote this month in a blog post published by Medical Economics. Are Your Physician’s Suffering from Moral Injury or Burnout?

Open post

STATNews: Physicians aren’t ‘burning out.’ They’re suffering from moral injury.

Wendy Dean, MD, and Simon Talbot, MD, explore the origin of physician distress with their landmark article on Moral Injury, Physicians aren’t ‘burning out.’ They’re suffering from moral injury.

Moral injury is frequently mischaracterized. In combat veterans it is diagnosed as post-traumatic stress; among physicians it’s portrayed as burnout. But without understanding the critical difference between burnout and moral injury, the wounds will never heal and physicians and patients alike will continue to suffer the consequences.

Open post

Moral Injury and the Ethics of Educational Injustice

This article uses a case study of a student who is on the verge of expulsion for bringing
pot to school in order to explore a class of ethical dilemmas in which educators have the
obligation to enact justice—to take action that fulfills the demands of justice—but have to do so
under conditions in which no just action is possible because of contextual and school-based
injustices.

Scroll to top